CFP: ASIST Annual Meeting 2018

The 81st Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology
November 9-14, 2018, Vancouver, Canada
 
BUILDING AN ETHICAL AND SUSTAINABLE INFORMATION FUTURE WITH EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES
 
This meeting will focus the creative and analytical energies of the ASIS&T community on the dramatic near horizon socio-technical shifts expected due to rapid developments in technologies such as artificial intelligence, big data analytics, virtual and augmented reality, and embedded, ubiquitous computing. The opportunities afforded by these technologies are enormous, as are the challenges of ensuring that ethical and human-centered perspectives, including sustainability, privacy, human agency and equity, are incorporated into their design and use. As interdisciplinary information science and technology researchers and practitioners, with an 80 year tradition of studying and working in this rapidly evolving field, we are uniquely situated to steward and mediate this shift. ASIS&T 2018 will provide an opportunity to learn from one another and from leading experts in these emerging technologies; to discuss, critique and pose the much-needed questions; and to share perspectives grounded in our own research and practice that intersect with and provide context for current developments.
 
The ASIS&T Annual Meeting is a premier, peer-reviewed international conference that gathers scholars and practitioners from around the globe to share research, innovations, and insights regarding the role of information and technology in the lives of individuals, organizations and communities.
 
We invite papers, posters and visual presentations, panel and workshop submissions that focus on the conference theme, as well as work that reflects the broader mandate of ASIS&T, regarding the creation, representation, storage, access, dissemination and use of information, media and records, and the systems, tools, and technologies associated with these processes. The conference embraces plurality in methods and theories, and encompasses research, development and practice from a broad spectrum of domains, as encapsulated in ASIS&T’s many special interest groups (SIGs).
 
We are pleased to announce that the ASIS&T 2018 Proceedings will be published by John Wiley & Sons and will be indexed and accessible via multiple international venues. Please note that at least one of the authors must register for the conference in order for a paper to be accepted and published in the proceedings.
 
SUBMISSION INFORMATION
 
The Conftool submission site is available here: ConfTool Submission Site
 
All submissions for Papers, Panels, Workshops & Visual Presentations must be formatted according to the guidelines provided in the ASIS&T AM template, as this is the required format for inclusion in the Proceedings. The template is available here:
 
AM18 Proposal Template
 
Tutorial Proposals must be submitted using this form:
 
Tutorial Proposal Form
 
IMPORTANT DATES
 
Papers, Panels, Workshops & Tutorials
 
Submission System opens: January 2, 2018
Submissions due: April 2, 2018
Notifications: May 4, 2018
Final publishable version due: July 15, 2018
 
Visual Presentations
Submission System opens: January 2, 2018
Submissions due: May 15, 2018
Notifications: June 15, 2018
Final publishable version due: July 15, 2018
 
SUBMISSION TYPES
 
1) Papers: Papers should discuss, analyze, critique theories and concepts, or report original, unpublished research; all papers must be substantiated by experimentation, simulation, theoretical development, analysis or application in practice. Submissions will be judged on such criteria as quality of content, significance for theory, relevance for practice, method, design, originality, and quality of presentation.
 
Length: The maximum length for a paper, including references, is 10 pages, single-spaced; submissions should be formatted according to the AM18 Proposal Template.
Peer Review: Submissions will be refereed in a double-blind review process and should be anonymized.
Publication: Accepted papers will be published in the proceedings.
2) Panels: Proposals for panels are invited on topics that explore emerging cutting-edge research and design, analyses of emerging trends, opinions on controversial issues, analyses of tools and techniques, or contrasting viewpoints from experts in complementary areas of research. Panels are not a substitute for a set of contributed papers; they must have a cohesive theme and promote lively discussions. Proposals should include an overview of the issues to be discussed and must also list panelists who have agreed to participate, indicating the qualifications and contributions of each.
 
Length: The maximum length for a panel proposal, including references, is 4 pages, single-spaced; submissions should be formatted according to the AM18 Proposal Template.
Peer Review: Panel proposals undergo single-blind review process and should not be anonymized.
Publication: Accepted panel proposals will be published in the proceedings.
3) Visual Presentations: Submissions in the form of short papers are invited for visual presentation via poster, demonstration, video, etc. at the meeting. Visual presentations are expected to invite questions and discussion and offer a unique opportunity to present late-breaking results, work in progress, or research that is best communicated in an interactive or graphical format. Authors are expected to address how the work will be presented at the meeting.
 
Length: Visual presentation proposals should be 2-pages in length, single spaced and including references; submissions should be formatted according to the AM18 Proposal Template.
Peer Review: Submissions will be refereed in a double-blind review process and should be anonymized.
Publication: Accepted visual presentation proposals will be published in the proceedings.
4) Workshops: Workshops will be held after the conference. The purpose of a workshop is to provide a more informal setting for the exchange of ideas on a focused topic and suggest directions for future work. As such, they offer a good opportunity for researchers and professionals to present and discuss their work among a targeted and interested community. Workshops may be mini-focused research presentations, a series of working events, brainstorming and idea sharing, or even teaching/learning a new skill. For more information on submitting a workshop, see the Workshop Guidelines.
 
Length: The maximum length for a workshop proposal, including references, is 3 pages, single-spaced; submissions should be formatted according to the AM18 Proposal Template.
Peer Review: Workshop proposals undergo single-blind review process and should not be anonymized.
Publication: Accepted workshop proposals will be published in the proceedings.
5) Tutorials: Tutorials will be held before the conference. Tutorials provide focused learning opportunities that will enable participants to develop a specific skill or competency.
 
Length: The maximum length for a tutorial proposal, including references, is 2 pages plus appendices using the Tutorial Proposal Form.
Peer Review: Tutorial proposals undergo single-blind review process and should not be anonymized.
6) Doctoral Colloquium: Keep watching this space for more information on the Doctoral Colloquium
 
ANNUAL MEETING PLANNING COMMITTEE
 
Conference Chair:
Luanne Freund, University of British Columbia, Canada
 
Paper Co-Chairs:
Christopher Lueg, University of Tasmania, Australia
Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin, Ireland
 
Panel Co-Chairs:
Rajesh Singh, St. John’s University, USA
Catherine L. Smith, Kent State University, USA
 
Poster Co-Chairs:
Julia Hersberger, University of North Carolina Greensboro, USA
Maayan Zhitomirsky-Geffet, Bar Ilan University, Israel
 
Workshops, Tutorials, local arrangements & logistics:
DeVonne Parks, ASIS&T Director of Meetings & Events
Lydia Middleton, ASIS&T Executive Director
 
For more information, contact asistam18@asist.org.
 
More information about the conference can be found at http://www.asist.org\am18.
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Call for Papers: AMCIS 2018: Minitrack: Shadow Information Technologies and Practices 

Minitrack: Shadow Information Technologies and Practices
Track: Organizational Transformation and Information Systems (SIGORSA)
24th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Aug. 16-18, 2018
New Orleans, LA, USA
Shadow Information Technologies and Practices is a new mini-track in the Organizational Transformation and Information Systems (SIGORSA) track.  This mini-track solicits papers that address the socio-technical implications, outcomes, and disruptive nature of shadow information technology (shadow IT) and shadow practices of organizational actors within complex organizations. Shadow IT refers to artifacts that are used or developed within organizations outside of and without the approval and knowledge of an organization’s IT department. Socio-technical shadow practices, also known as feral practices, are those in which organizational actors engage with either shadow IT or existing systems in ways that differ from the expected practices, and which take place unbeknownst to organizational and IT managers.
The emergence of shadow IT and practices can have broad socio-technical implications for organizations, including those related to organizational power relations, IT governance, and security. Given the theme of the conference, Digital Disruption, we are particularly interested in papers that examine the emergence of shadow IT and practices in response to the introduction and digital disruption of new technologies within business and organizations.
In addition to research aligned with the conference theme we are also interested in high quality empirical and conceptual work that seeks to study and understand other aspects of shadow IT and practices. Suggested topics could include:
• Effects of shadow IT and practices on organizational work-flow, culture, and structure
• Implications of shadow IT and practices for organizational power relationships
• Conceptual work that categorizes the types of shadow practices that occur within organizations
• Ways in which managers can, do, or should respond to the presence of shadow IT and practices
• Security and other issues that arise when organizations actors develop and use shadow IT
Mini-Track chairs
Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University  hrosenba@indiana.edu
Chase McCoy, Indiana University  chamccoy@indiana.edu
Submission Instructions:
Important Dates:
January 15, 2018: Manuscript submissions open
February 28, 2018: Deadline for paper submissions
April 18, 2018: Authors will be notified of decisions
April 25, 2018: Camera-ready submissions due

Call for Papers: AMCIS 2018: Minitrack: Social Theory in Information Systems Research (STIR ’18)

Minitrack: Social Theory in Information Systems Research (STIR ’18)
Track: Social Inclusion (SIGSI)
24th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Aug. 16-18, 2018
New Orleans, LA, USA
This minitrack solicits papers using social theory to critically examine ICTs and their roles in enabling and constraining social inclusion. What can be done to improve access to computing for underrepresented groups? In what ways do new technologies impact digital divides? What are the social, cultural, political, and economic implications of the Internet of things? These are examples of the kinds of questions we are interested in exploring in this minitrack. We are particularly interested in completed or emerging research using social theory to address the conference theme, Digital Disruption, critically examining the ways in which emerging technologies are changing the sociotechnical landscape in ways that narrow or widen the digital divide.
This will be the 18th consecutive year for STIR, and we hope to continue a tradition of high quality papers, and thought-provoking and lively discussion for IS researchers using social theory in their work.
In addition to research aligned with the conference theme we are also interested in high quality empirical and conceptual work that uses social theory to investigate issues such as (but not limited to):
• Improving access to computing for underrepresented minorities
• Reengineering the pipeline in STEM education for greater inclusiveness and diversity
• Critically assessing the ways in which ICTs and information systems can be used to privilege some and exclude others
• Understanding the impacts of the Internet of Things on the digital divide
• Assessing the unintended consequences of technology implementation and use in organizations and in social life
• Reflection on the ways in which ICT assemblages support and challenge political, cultural, and economic hegemonies.
Mini-Track chairs
Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University  hrosenba@indiana.edu
Pnia Fichman, Indiana University  fichman@indiana.edu
Submission Instructions:
Important Dates:
January 15, 2018: Manuscript submissions open
February 28, 2018: Deadline for paper submissions
April 18, 2018: Authors will be notified of decisions
April 25, 2018: Camera-ready submissions due

SIG SI Election Results & 2017-18 Officers

Hi everyone, I am now able to report the results of our recent election for SIG SI officers. This includes votes received from the morning of November 2nd until the evening of November 9th. (Note that one duplicate ballot — from the same IP as one submitted three minutes earlier — was discarded, but would not have impacted the winners.)

Emad Khazraee is our new SIG SI Chair, with 17 votes for. There were 6 abstentions.

Kirstin Phelps is our new SIG SI Secretary, with 15 votes for. 6 votes went to Charlene Finley, with 2 abstentions.

Xiaohua Awa Zhu is our new SIG SI Treasurer, with 21 votes for. There were 2 abstentions.

Catherine  Dumas and Rachel Simons are our new SIG SI Communications officers, with 23 votes for (and no abstentions).

Congratulations to Emad, Kirstin, Awa, Catherine, and Rachel, who will serve alongside the continuing Kristin Eschenfelder as Awards Coordinator and Adam Worrall as Social Chair. Here’s to a great year for SIG SI!

Adam Worrall, SIG Social Chair

SIG SI Social Gathering at ASIS&T 2017

Message from our Social Chair:

Hi all, on behalf of SIG SI and co-chairs Kalpana and Eric I would like to invite you to our social gathering and dinner during ASIS&T 2017, to take place on Monday at 5pm at Jaleo, 2250 Crystal Dr #A, Crystal City, VA 22202 (https://www.jaleo.com/location/crystal-city/). This is a Spanish / tapas place that has good reviews and is about a 10-minute walk from the Hyatt (the ASIS&T conference hotel). Anyone who is walking over directly from the hotel should feel free to meet up in the hotel lobby around 4:45pm, and we will walk over together for 5pm. The timing will allow for returning to the hotel for the poster session at 6:30pm that evening. Join us for food, casual conversation, and networking! If you plan to attend, a brief email to me (worrall@ualberta.ca) would be appreciated and will help give us an idea of the numbers we’ll be expecting. Feel free to invite friends and colleagues who may be interested as well. Look forward to seeing you all for all of SIG SI’s events and activities during ASIS&T 2017!

Adam Worrall, Ph.D.
Social Chair, ASIS&T SIG SI
Assistant Professor, University of Alberta
School of Library and Information Studies
3-15 Rutherford South
Edmonton, AB T6G 2J4
worrall@ualberta.ca

SIG SI Officer Positions Nominations

Hi SIG SI members, we are now seeking nominations for three officer positions with the SIG.

The first of these is for the position of Chair or Co-Chair of the SIG for 2017-18. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Chair or Co-Chair include organizing and running SIG SI’s annual symposium / workshop, with assistance from invited symposium committee members (if desired); coordinating panel proposals that SIG SI may sponsor for the ASIS&T Annual Meeting; support the process of determining the winners of SIG SI’s awards, alongside SIG SI’s Awards Coordinator (currently Kristin Eschenfelder); attend the SIG Cabinet Meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting (or determine a suitable substitute delegate from among the SIG officers); and other leadership activities for the SIG, if desired and as determined along with SIG SI’s other officers. Both outgoing SIG SI Co-Chairs, Kalpana Shankar and Eric Meyer, will remain around as past chairs to offer input and advice, help out with the transition, and encourage continuity.

The second officer position we are seeking nominations for is Secretary. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Secretary are focused on keeping notes from and records of all meetings (including the SIG’s business meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting) and assisting with arrangements for SIG meetings and activities. Examples of the latter for past Secretaries have included helping manage the peer review process for symposium submissions and assisting with the SIG’s former newsletter.

We are also seeking nominations for the position of Treasurer. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Treasurer are focused on maintaining records of the SIG’s budget, keeping in close contact with SIG Cabinet about our yearly allocations. The Treasurer ensures the SIG remains viable financially and provides report on the SIG’s finances at the SIG’s business meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting.

The Treasurer, Secretary, and SIG Chair should collaborate with each other and in conjunction with other SIG SI officers to determine the SIG’s planned activities each year, providing for submissions to SIG Cabinet as called for by that body. The Secretary and Treasurer have typically been separate people in the SIG’s past, but the same person may serve in both roles if able and willing; the Chair / Co-Chair should not also be the Secretary or Treasurer. Once elected, the Chair / Co-Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer would serve alongside the SIG’s other continuing officers, including Communications officer Catherine Dumas (Albany), Social Chair Adam Worrall (Alberta), and Awards Coordinator Kristin Eschenfelder (Wisconsin – Madison). As noted, former and outgoing SIG officers will also be around to help with the transition and to offer input and advice where and when needed.

If you or someone you know is potentially interested in stepping up and serving as SIG SI’s Chair / Co-Chair, Secretary, and/or Treasurer, please submit a nomination to myself (worrall@ualberta.ca) by Monday October 16th at 8pm US Eastern time. Please include SIG SI in the subject line. We thank you for your consideration of these crucial roles within the SIG!

Adam Worrall, Ph.D.
Elections Coordinator, ASIS&T SIG SI
Assistant Professor, University of Alberta
School of Library and Information Studies
3-15 Rutherford South
Edmonton, AB T6G 2J4
worrall@ualberta.ca  (780) 492-0179
http://www.adamworrall.org

SIG SI Business Meeting ASIS&T 2017 in Wash DC

SIG SI Business Meeting at ASIS&T 2017 will be on Tuesday 10/31 at 2:00pm-3:30pm in the Roosevelt Room at the conference hotel.
 
Note: There are officer positions available for the upcoming year. This is a great way to get involved. Hope to see you there!!!

Position in Science and Technology Studies – Data Science – University of California, Davis.

The University of California, Davis invites applicants for a tenure-track assistant professor or recently tenured associate professor in the social studies of data and data science including the scientific, political, social, and scholarly use and creation of data. Experience and a genuine interest in working in a collaborative environment and especially in collaborating with data scientists are highly desired. The successful applicant will be appointed in the Science and Technology Studies Program, with expectation for cross-appointment in an emergent multidisciplinary data science program. The appointee is expected to actively participate in the growing interdisciplinary team of the Data Science Initiative and to take a central role in teaching in and developing a new Data Studies minor. Aimed at social science and humanities students, this minor is designed to introduce students to data science concepts and techniques, teach them to critically analyze and contextualize data questions and results, and prepare them to collaborate with data scientists in work environments.

Applicants should have expertise in one or more of the following areas: ethnography or history of the scientific, political, social, and scholarly use and creation of data; computational media; software studies; and ethics, law, and policy of data. Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in STS on topics related to critical approaches to data science; data visualization; or information ethics, privacy and policy. Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in STS and on topics related to critical approaches to data science; data visualization; information ethics, privacy and policy; Successful applicants will also be expected to teach introductory Data Studies courses focusing on data analysis using Excel, R, or equivalent. A Ph.D. in either science and technology studies, anthropology, media studies, philosophy, cultural studies, communication, sociology, or a related field should be completed by September 23, 2018.

Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in data studies. Applicants should submit a cover letter, a CV, 3 letters of recommendation, and a writing sample. Applicants should also submit 2-3 example syllabi, one of which should propose a version of either STS 101 or STS 115 (course descriptions available at http://sts.ucdavis.edu/courses/course-descriptions/data-studies).

Applications must be submitted by November 13, 2017, through the online application form: https://recruit.ucdavis.edu/apply/JPF01850.

The University of California, Davis, is an affirmative action / equal opportunity employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity.

UC Davis STS Recruitment Ad 2017

The 13th Annual Social Informatics (SIG-SI) Research Symposium: The Social Informatics of Knowledge

UPDATE: We had a bumper crop of submissions to the workshop, and are excited the make the final schedule available here as a PDF file: SIGSI_Schedule_FINAL .

The 13th Annual Social Informatics (SIG-SI) Research Symposium “The Social Informatics of Knowledge” will be held from 8:30 – 12:30 on Saturday 28 October at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, VA, USA, with papers from 13 presenters on topics including fake news, video game design, networks of male sex workers, digital nomads, scientific collaborations, data science norms, and many other cutting edge areas of research.

Please register to join us for this exciting pre-conference event when you complete your registration for the annual meeting (https://www.asist.org/am17/register/).

Original call:

We are soliciting papers on the Social Informatics of Knowledge for a pre-conference ASIST workshop.  Specifically, we are looking for extended abstracts and papers that advance the concepts, methods and theories that support the social informatics perspective.  Social informatics is the study of the connections among people and the technologies they use is a lens to understand a wide variety of topics linked by a recognition of the “integration of information and communication technologies into organizations…[which has] now spread from organizations…[into] people’s social lives” (Fichman & Rosenbaum, 2014, p. x). We are particularly keen to see submissions that look at questions about how knowledge – broadly conceived – can be better understood when we look at the social contexts in which knowledge is created, generated, organized, shared, and used.

Kling (2000) pointed out that in socio-technical models of ICT in society, “…knowledge and expertise are inherently tacit/implicit…” (p. 220) as opposed to explicit: all too often, the processes of knowledge generation and discovery are hidden behind (or within a black box of) technology. There is obviously considerable research on knowledge in a variety of outlets (see Hislop, 2013 for a comprehensive review). This said, many of these focus on specific practices of knowledge management and are often constrained to the realms of formal organizations (Grant, 2011) instead of the broader socio-technical questions of how knowledge practices are embedded within and enabled by technical systems. Ackerman, Dachtera, Pipek, and Wulf (2013) in their survey of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) highlight the development of our understanding of knowledge and information in organizations.  By way of comparison, Hara and Fichman (2014) argue that we can use social informatics and the concept of boundaries to better understand knowledge sharing in the social media space, while Auernhammer and Hall (2014) focus on how leadership and social conditions within organizations are reflected in knowledge creation processes.

We seek submissions that extend our understanding of how we can better explain knowledge practices by looking at the connections between people and technologies, which we have elsewhere called ‘examining the hyphen’ in the socio-technical sphere (Meyer, 2014) that represents the connections of the social to the technical. Interested participants are also encouraged to look at Kling’s foundational paper on the nature of the entanglement between the social and the technical in which he wrote that social informatics is “the interdisciplinary study of the design, uses and consequences of information technologies that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts” (Kling, 2007, p. 205). We expect an engaging discussion, with expert feedback on papers and lively interactions with the audience.

The topics of this workshop and associated special issue include, but are not limited to, social informatics empirical research and/or theory development in the areas of:

  • Knowledge:
    • Creation
    • Dissemination
    • Screening / filtering
    • Validation / authentication
    • Consumption
    • Impact
  • Knowledge generation and sharing platforms
    • Online knowledge spaces
    • Changing knowledge standards in news and politics
  • Novel approaches to knowledge generation, including:
    • Big data approaches
    • Machine learning
    • Computational models
    • Topic discovery
    • Scientific workflows
  • Knowledge discovery techniques, including:
    • Corpora-based information extraction
    • Data mining
    • Data visualization and other exploratory efforts
    • Trace data collection
    • Multiple methods
  • Collaborative scientific practices, including:
    • The roles of groups/teams/collectives in knowledge generation
    • Group memory and knowledge sharing
    • Distributed scientific collaboration
    • Knowledge and innovation

 

Special ISSUE OF JASIST:

The ASIST pre-conference workshop will serve as an optional paper development workshop for a special issue of JASIST on Social Informatics (final submission due January 15 2018).  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to present their papers-in-development for feedback and discussion, and will also have the opportunity to discuss how social informatics can be embedded in their work. Special issue co-editors Eric T. Meyer, Kalpana Shankar, and Steve Sawyer will be on hand and give feedback to individual paper presenters. A half-hour mini-workshop will end the symposium, with information both on the special issue procedures and goals and more general information on successful publishing in JASIS&T and elsewhere.

Authors who wish to take full advantage of the opportunity for mentoring and feedback on their papers are encouraged to submit optional full or draft papers by 15 October.

NOTE: Authors who are unable to attend the workshop will not be disadvantaged – all papers will go through a full peer review process to decide which papers to include in the special issue. The workshop is designed to help those who want some guidance that might not be as readily available locally to have access to the expertise they need to develop their papers or just want some extra feedback before submitting.

For more information on the planned special issue, see LINK.

Call for papers and posters:

Please submit an extended abstract of up to 750 words by August 15, 2017 with author names, affiliations, and contact information with ‘SIG-SI Workshop’ in the subject line to Kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie and eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk. Accepted extended abstracts will be shared with other workshop participants.

Papers that explicitly advance social informatics concepts, theories, or methods will be given priority in the review process.

Acceptance announcements will be made by September 1, 2017 in time for conference early registration (ends Sept 15).

Late submissions up to Sept 30 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will only be accepted if there is still space in the program.

We aim to have an interactive workshop to enable the fullest exchange of ideas amongst attendees. For this reason, we encourage participants from both SIG-SI members and non-members, and enthusiastically support attendance and participation even if you don’t have a paper to present.

 Tentative Schedule

The workshop is scheduled for Saturday 28 October 2017 from 8:30 – 12:30 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, VA.

Opening keynote: 8:30-9:00

Paper presentations & feedback: 9:00-10:30

Paper awards, followed by coffee break: 10:30-11:00

Paper presentations & feedback: 11:00-11:30

Closing keynote: 11:30-12:00

JASIS&T special issue mini-workshop: 12:00-12:30

 

FEES
Members: $115
Non-members $125

Symposium Organizers:

 

Kalpana Shankar
University College Dublin (Ireland)
kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie
Eric T. Meyer
University of Oxford (UK)
eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

JASIST Special Issue on “The Social Informatics of Knowledge”

In this special issue of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, we are calling for papers that advance the concepts, methods and theories that support the social informatics perspective.  Social informatics as the study of the connections among people and the technologies they use is a lens to understand a wide variety of topics linked by a recognition of the “integration of information and communication technologies into organizations…[which has] now spread from organizations…[into] people’s social lives” (Fichman & Rosenbaum, 2014, p. x). We are particularly keen to see papers that look at questions about how knowledge – broadly conceived – can be better understood when we look at the social contexts in which knowledge is created, generated, organized, shared, and used.

 

Kling (2000) pointed out that in socio-technical models of ICT in society, “…knowledge and expertise are inherently tacit/implicit…” (p. 220) as opposed to explicit: all too often, the processes of knowledge generation and discovery are hidden behind (or within a black box of) technology. There is obviously considerable research on knowledge in a variety of outlets (see Hislop, 2013 for a comprehensive review). This said, many of these focus on specific practices of knowledge management and are often constrained to the realms of formal organizations (Grant, 2011) instead of the broader socio-technical questions of how knowledge practices are embedded within and enabled by technical systems. Ackerman, Dachtera, Pipek, and Wulf (2013) in their survey of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) highlight the development of our understanding of knowledge and information in organizations.  By way of comparison, Hara and Fichman (2014) argue that we can use social informatics and the concept of boundaries to better understand knowledge sharing in the social media space, while Auernhammer and Hall (2014) focus on how leadership and social conditions within organizations are reflected in knowledge creation processes.

 

For this special issue, we seek submissions that extend our understanding of how we can better explain knowledge practices by looking at the connections between people and technologies, which we have elsewhere called ‘examining the hyphen’ in the socio-technical sphere (Meyer, 2014) that represents the connections of the social to the technical. Interested authors are also encouraged to look at Kling’s foundational paper on the nature of the entanglement between the social and the technical in which he wrote that social informatics is “the interdisciplinary study of the design, uses and consequences of information technologies that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts” (Kling, 2007, p. 205).

 

Examples can be drawn from any domain or across multiple domains, but we will be particularly interested in papers which foreground this relationship between people and technology in their analysis.

 

Topics of Interest

The topics of this special issue include, but are not limited to, social informatics empirical research and/or theory development in the areas of:

  • Knowledge:
    • Creation
    • Dissemination
    • Screening / filtering
    • Validation / authentication
    • Consumption
    • Impact
  • Knowledge generation and sharing platforms
    • Online knowledge spaces
    • Changing knowledge standards in news and politics
  • Novel approaches to knowledge generation, including:
    • Big data approaches
    • Machine learning
    • Computational models
    • Topic discovery
    • Scientific workflows
  • Knowledge discovery techniques, including:
    • Corpora-based information extraction
    • Data mining
    • Data visualization and other exploratory efforts
    • Trace data collection
    • Multiple methods
  • Collaborative scientific practices, including:
    • The roles of teams in knowledge generation
    • Team-based memory and knowledge sharing
    • Distributed scientific collaboration
    • Knowledge and innovation

 

Submission Guidelines

Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have carefully read the JASIST Submission Guidelines (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2330-1643/homepage/ForAuthors.html). The complete manuscript should be submitted through JASIST’s Submission System (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jasist). To insure that you submit to the correct special issue, please select “Special Issue on The Social Informatics of Knowledge” as your manuscript type.

 

Paper Development Workshop sponsored by SIG-SI at ASIS&T 2017

On the morning of October 28, 2017, the guest editors of this special issue will host an optional paper development workshop at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science & Technology in Washington D.C. (Crystal City, Virginia), USA. At this workshop, which will be held in conjunction with the SIG-SI (the Social Informatics Special Interest Group) pre-conference research symposium, participants will be given the opportunity to present their papers-in-development for feedback and discussion, and will also have the opportunity to discuss how social informatics can be embedded in their work.

 

Authors who are unable to attend the workshop will not be disadvantaged – all papers will go through a full peer review process to decide which papers to include in the special issue. The workshop is designed to help those who want some guidance that might not be as readily available locally to have access to the expertise they need to develop their papers. For more information on submitting your work to the workshop, see LINK. Extended abstracts of up to 750 words are due 15 August 2017, and should be submitted to kalpana.shankar@ucd.iu and eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk with ‘SIG-SI Workshop’ in the subject line.

 

Submission Deadlines

Paper submission due: January 15, 2018
First round review notification: April 2, 2018
Revision due: June 1, 2018
Final notification: August 15, 2018

 

Guest Editors

Eric T. Meyer, University of Oxford, UK (eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk) (ASIS&T SIG-SI Co-Chair)

Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin, Ireland (kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie) (ASIS&T SIG-SI Co-Chair)

Matthew Willis, University of Oxford, UK (matthew.willis@oii.ox.ac.uk)

Sarika Sharma, Syracuse University, USA (skshar01@syr.edu)

Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University, USA (ssawyer@syr.edu)

 

References cited

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Auernhammer, Jan and Hall, Hazel. (2014). Organizational culture in knowledge creation, creativity and innovation: Towards the Freiraum model. Journal of Information Science, 40(2), 154-166.

Fichman, Pnina and Rosenbaum, Howard. (2014). Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Grant, Kenneth A. (2011). Knowledge Management: An Enduring but Confusing Fashion. Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management, 9(2), 117-131.

Hara, Noriko and Fichman, Pnina. (2014). Frameworks for Understanding Knowledge Sharing in Online Communities: Boundaries and Boundary Crossing. In Pnina Fichman and Howard Rosenbaum (Eds.), Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future (pp. 89-100). Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Hislop, Donald. (2013). Knowledge management in organizations: A critical introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kling, Rob. (2000). Learning About Information Technologies and Social Change: The Contribution of Social Informatics. The Information Society, 16(3), 217-232.

Kling, Rob. (2007). What Is Social Informatics and Why Does It Matter? The Information Society, 23(4), 205 – 220.

Meyer, Eric T. (2014). Examining the Hyphen: The Value of Social Informatics for Research and Teaching. In Pnina Fichman and Howard Rosenbaum (Eds.), Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future (pp. 57-74). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholarly Publishers.

 

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