SIG SI Officer Positions Nominations

Hi SIG SI members, we are now seeking nominations for three officer positions with the SIG.

The first of these is for the position of Chair or Co-Chair of the SIG for 2017-18. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Chair or Co-Chair include organizing and running SIG SI’s annual symposium / workshop, with assistance from invited symposium committee members (if desired); coordinating panel proposals that SIG SI may sponsor for the ASIS&T Annual Meeting; support the process of determining the winners of SIG SI’s awards, alongside SIG SI’s Awards Coordinator (currently Kristin Eschenfelder); attend the SIG Cabinet Meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting (or determine a suitable substitute delegate from among the SIG officers); and other leadership activities for the SIG, if desired and as determined along with SIG SI’s other officers. Both outgoing SIG SI Co-Chairs, Kalpana Shankar and Eric Meyer, will remain around as past chairs to offer input and advice, help out with the transition, and encourage continuity.

The second officer position we are seeking nominations for is Secretary. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Secretary are focused on keeping notes from and records of all meetings (including the SIG’s business meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting) and assisting with arrangements for SIG meetings and activities. Examples of the latter for past Secretaries have included helping manage the peer review process for symposium submissions and assisting with the SIG’s former newsletter.

We are also seeking nominations for the position of Treasurer. The responsibilities of the SIG’s Treasurer are focused on maintaining records of the SIG’s budget, keeping in close contact with SIG Cabinet about our yearly allocations. The Treasurer ensures the SIG remains viable financially and provides report on the SIG’s finances at the SIG’s business meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting.

The Treasurer, Secretary, and SIG Chair should collaborate with each other and in conjunction with other SIG SI officers to determine the SIG’s planned activities each year, providing for submissions to SIG Cabinet as called for by that body. The Secretary and Treasurer have typically been separate people in the SIG’s past, but the same person may serve in both roles if able and willing; the Chair / Co-Chair should not also be the Secretary or Treasurer. Once elected, the Chair / Co-Chair, Secretary, and Treasurer would serve alongside the SIG’s other continuing officers, including Communications officer Catherine Dumas (Albany), Social Chair Adam Worrall (Alberta), and Awards Coordinator Kristin Eschenfelder (Wisconsin – Madison). As noted, former and outgoing SIG officers will also be around to help with the transition and to offer input and advice where and when needed.

If you or someone you know is potentially interested in stepping up and serving as SIG SI’s Chair / Co-Chair, Secretary, and/or Treasurer, please submit a nomination to myself (worrall@ualberta.ca) by Monday October 16th at 8pm US Eastern time. Please include SIG SI in the subject line. We thank you for your consideration of these crucial roles within the SIG!

Adam Worrall, Ph.D.
Elections Coordinator, ASIS&T SIG SI
Assistant Professor, University of Alberta
School of Library and Information Studies
3-15 Rutherford South
Edmonton, AB T6G 2J4
worrall@ualberta.ca  (780) 492-0179
http://www.adamworrall.org

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SIG SI Business Meeting ASIS&T 2017 in Wash DC

SIG SI Business Meeting at ASIS&T 2017 will be on Tuesday 10/31 at 2:00pm-3:30pm in the Roosevelt Room at the conference hotel.
 
Note: There are officer positions available for the upcoming year. This is a great way to get involved. Hope to see you there!!!

Position in Science and Technology Studies – Data Science – University of California, Davis.

The University of California, Davis invites applicants for a tenure-track assistant professor or recently tenured associate professor in the social studies of data and data science including the scientific, political, social, and scholarly use and creation of data. Experience and a genuine interest in working in a collaborative environment and especially in collaborating with data scientists are highly desired. The successful applicant will be appointed in the Science and Technology Studies Program, with expectation for cross-appointment in an emergent multidisciplinary data science program. The appointee is expected to actively participate in the growing interdisciplinary team of the Data Science Initiative and to take a central role in teaching in and developing a new Data Studies minor. Aimed at social science and humanities students, this minor is designed to introduce students to data science concepts and techniques, teach them to critically analyze and contextualize data questions and results, and prepare them to collaborate with data scientists in work environments.

Applicants should have expertise in one or more of the following areas: ethnography or history of the scientific, political, social, and scholarly use and creation of data; computational media; software studies; and ethics, law, and policy of data. Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in STS on topics related to critical approaches to data science; data visualization; or information ethics, privacy and policy. Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in STS and on topics related to critical approaches to data science; data visualization; information ethics, privacy and policy; Successful applicants will also be expected to teach introductory Data Studies courses focusing on data analysis using Excel, R, or equivalent. A Ph.D. in either science and technology studies, anthropology, media studies, philosophy, cultural studies, communication, sociology, or a related field should be completed by September 23, 2018.

Applicants should be prepared to teach undergraduate and graduate courses in data studies. Applicants should submit a cover letter, a CV, 3 letters of recommendation, and a writing sample. Applicants should also submit 2-3 example syllabi, one of which should propose a version of either STS 101 or STS 115 (course descriptions available at http://sts.ucdavis.edu/courses/course-descriptions/data-studies).

Applications must be submitted by November 13, 2017, through the online application form: https://recruit.ucdavis.edu/apply/JPF01850.

The University of California, Davis, is an affirmative action / equal opportunity employer with a strong institutional commitment to the achievement of diversity.

UC Davis STS Recruitment Ad 2017

The 13th Annual Social Informatics (SIG-SI) Research Symposium: The Social Informatics of Knowledge

UPDATE: We had a bumper crop of submissions to the workshop, and are excited the make the final schedule available here as a PDF file: SIGSI_Schedule_FINAL .

The 13th Annual Social Informatics (SIG-SI) Research Symposium “The Social Informatics of Knowledge” will be held from 8:30 – 12:30 on Saturday 28 October at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, VA, USA, with papers from 13 presenters on topics including fake news, video game design, networks of male sex workers, digital nomads, scientific collaborations, data science norms, and many other cutting edge areas of research.

Please register to join us for this exciting pre-conference event when you complete your registration for the annual meeting (https://www.asist.org/am17/register/).

Original call:

We are soliciting papers on the Social Informatics of Knowledge for a pre-conference ASIST workshop.  Specifically, we are looking for extended abstracts and papers that advance the concepts, methods and theories that support the social informatics perspective.  Social informatics is the study of the connections among people and the technologies they use is a lens to understand a wide variety of topics linked by a recognition of the “integration of information and communication technologies into organizations…[which has] now spread from organizations…[into] people’s social lives” (Fichman & Rosenbaum, 2014, p. x). We are particularly keen to see submissions that look at questions about how knowledge – broadly conceived – can be better understood when we look at the social contexts in which knowledge is created, generated, organized, shared, and used.

Kling (2000) pointed out that in socio-technical models of ICT in society, “…knowledge and expertise are inherently tacit/implicit…” (p. 220) as opposed to explicit: all too often, the processes of knowledge generation and discovery are hidden behind (or within a black box of) technology. There is obviously considerable research on knowledge in a variety of outlets (see Hislop, 2013 for a comprehensive review). This said, many of these focus on specific practices of knowledge management and are often constrained to the realms of formal organizations (Grant, 2011) instead of the broader socio-technical questions of how knowledge practices are embedded within and enabled by technical systems. Ackerman, Dachtera, Pipek, and Wulf (2013) in their survey of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) highlight the development of our understanding of knowledge and information in organizations.  By way of comparison, Hara and Fichman (2014) argue that we can use social informatics and the concept of boundaries to better understand knowledge sharing in the social media space, while Auernhammer and Hall (2014) focus on how leadership and social conditions within organizations are reflected in knowledge creation processes.

We seek submissions that extend our understanding of how we can better explain knowledge practices by looking at the connections between people and technologies, which we have elsewhere called ‘examining the hyphen’ in the socio-technical sphere (Meyer, 2014) that represents the connections of the social to the technical. Interested participants are also encouraged to look at Kling’s foundational paper on the nature of the entanglement between the social and the technical in which he wrote that social informatics is “the interdisciplinary study of the design, uses and consequences of information technologies that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts” (Kling, 2007, p. 205). We expect an engaging discussion, with expert feedback on papers and lively interactions with the audience.

The topics of this workshop and associated special issue include, but are not limited to, social informatics empirical research and/or theory development in the areas of:

  • Knowledge:
    • Creation
    • Dissemination
    • Screening / filtering
    • Validation / authentication
    • Consumption
    • Impact
  • Knowledge generation and sharing platforms
    • Online knowledge spaces
    • Changing knowledge standards in news and politics
  • Novel approaches to knowledge generation, including:
    • Big data approaches
    • Machine learning
    • Computational models
    • Topic discovery
    • Scientific workflows
  • Knowledge discovery techniques, including:
    • Corpora-based information extraction
    • Data mining
    • Data visualization and other exploratory efforts
    • Trace data collection
    • Multiple methods
  • Collaborative scientific practices, including:
    • The roles of groups/teams/collectives in knowledge generation
    • Group memory and knowledge sharing
    • Distributed scientific collaboration
    • Knowledge and innovation

 

Special ISSUE OF JASIST:

The ASIST pre-conference workshop will serve as an optional paper development workshop for a special issue of JASIST on Social Informatics (final submission due January 15 2018).  Workshop participants will be given the opportunity to present their papers-in-development for feedback and discussion, and will also have the opportunity to discuss how social informatics can be embedded in their work. Special issue co-editors Eric T. Meyer, Kalpana Shankar, and Steve Sawyer will be on hand and give feedback to individual paper presenters. A half-hour mini-workshop will end the symposium, with information both on the special issue procedures and goals and more general information on successful publishing in JASIS&T and elsewhere.

Authors who wish to take full advantage of the opportunity for mentoring and feedback on their papers are encouraged to submit optional full or draft papers by 15 October.

NOTE: Authors who are unable to attend the workshop will not be disadvantaged – all papers will go through a full peer review process to decide which papers to include in the special issue. The workshop is designed to help those who want some guidance that might not be as readily available locally to have access to the expertise they need to develop their papers or just want some extra feedback before submitting.

For more information on the planned special issue, see LINK.

Call for papers and posters:

Please submit an extended abstract of up to 750 words by August 15, 2017 with author names, affiliations, and contact information with ‘SIG-SI Workshop’ in the subject line to Kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie and eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk. Accepted extended abstracts will be shared with other workshop participants.

Papers that explicitly advance social informatics concepts, theories, or methods will be given priority in the review process.

Acceptance announcements will be made by September 1, 2017 in time for conference early registration (ends Sept 15).

Late submissions up to Sept 30 will be considered on a rolling basis, and will only be accepted if there is still space in the program.

We aim to have an interactive workshop to enable the fullest exchange of ideas amongst attendees. For this reason, we encourage participants from both SIG-SI members and non-members, and enthusiastically support attendance and participation even if you don’t have a paper to present.

 Tentative Schedule

The workshop is scheduled for Saturday 28 October 2017 from 8:30 – 12:30 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City, VA.

Opening keynote: 8:30-9:00

Paper presentations & feedback: 9:00-10:30

Paper awards, followed by coffee break: 10:30-11:00

Paper presentations & feedback: 11:00-11:30

Closing keynote: 11:30-12:00

JASIS&T special issue mini-workshop: 12:00-12:30

 

FEES
Members: $115
Non-members $125

Symposium Organizers:

 

Kalpana Shankar
University College Dublin (Ireland)
kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie
Eric T. Meyer
University of Oxford (UK)
eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

JASIST Special Issue on “The Social Informatics of Knowledge”

In this special issue of the Journal of the Association for Information Science and Technology, we are calling for papers that advance the concepts, methods and theories that support the social informatics perspective.  Social informatics as the study of the connections among people and the technologies they use is a lens to understand a wide variety of topics linked by a recognition of the “integration of information and communication technologies into organizations…[which has] now spread from organizations…[into] people’s social lives” (Fichman & Rosenbaum, 2014, p. x). We are particularly keen to see papers that look at questions about how knowledge – broadly conceived – can be better understood when we look at the social contexts in which knowledge is created, generated, organized, shared, and used.

 

Kling (2000) pointed out that in socio-technical models of ICT in society, “…knowledge and expertise are inherently tacit/implicit…” (p. 220) as opposed to explicit: all too often, the processes of knowledge generation and discovery are hidden behind (or within a black box of) technology. There is obviously considerable research on knowledge in a variety of outlets (see Hislop, 2013 for a comprehensive review). This said, many of these focus on specific practices of knowledge management and are often constrained to the realms of formal organizations (Grant, 2011) instead of the broader socio-technical questions of how knowledge practices are embedded within and enabled by technical systems. Ackerman, Dachtera, Pipek, and Wulf (2013) in their survey of computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) highlight the development of our understanding of knowledge and information in organizations.  By way of comparison, Hara and Fichman (2014) argue that we can use social informatics and the concept of boundaries to better understand knowledge sharing in the social media space, while Auernhammer and Hall (2014) focus on how leadership and social conditions within organizations are reflected in knowledge creation processes.

 

For this special issue, we seek submissions that extend our understanding of how we can better explain knowledge practices by looking at the connections between people and technologies, which we have elsewhere called ‘examining the hyphen’ in the socio-technical sphere (Meyer, 2014) that represents the connections of the social to the technical. Interested authors are also encouraged to look at Kling’s foundational paper on the nature of the entanglement between the social and the technical in which he wrote that social informatics is “the interdisciplinary study of the design, uses and consequences of information technologies that takes into account their interaction with institutional and cultural contexts” (Kling, 2007, p. 205).

 

Examples can be drawn from any domain or across multiple domains, but we will be particularly interested in papers which foreground this relationship between people and technology in their analysis.

 

Topics of Interest

The topics of this special issue include, but are not limited to, social informatics empirical research and/or theory development in the areas of:

  • Knowledge:
    • Creation
    • Dissemination
    • Screening / filtering
    • Validation / authentication
    • Consumption
    • Impact
  • Knowledge generation and sharing platforms
    • Online knowledge spaces
    • Changing knowledge standards in news and politics
  • Novel approaches to knowledge generation, including:
    • Big data approaches
    • Machine learning
    • Computational models
    • Topic discovery
    • Scientific workflows
  • Knowledge discovery techniques, including:
    • Corpora-based information extraction
    • Data mining
    • Data visualization and other exploratory efforts
    • Trace data collection
    • Multiple methods
  • Collaborative scientific practices, including:
    • The roles of teams in knowledge generation
    • Team-based memory and knowledge sharing
    • Distributed scientific collaboration
    • Knowledge and innovation

 

Submission Guidelines

Before submitting your manuscript, please ensure you have carefully read the JASIST Submission Guidelines (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2330-1643/homepage/ForAuthors.html). The complete manuscript should be submitted through JASIST’s Submission System (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jasist). To insure that you submit to the correct special issue, please select “Special Issue on The Social Informatics of Knowledge” as your manuscript type.

 

Paper Development Workshop sponsored by SIG-SI at ASIS&T 2017

On the morning of October 28, 2017, the guest editors of this special issue will host an optional paper development workshop at the 80th Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science & Technology in Washington D.C. (Crystal City, Virginia), USA. At this workshop, which will be held in conjunction with the SIG-SI (the Social Informatics Special Interest Group) pre-conference research symposium, participants will be given the opportunity to present their papers-in-development for feedback and discussion, and will also have the opportunity to discuss how social informatics can be embedded in their work.

 

Authors who are unable to attend the workshop will not be disadvantaged – all papers will go through a full peer review process to decide which papers to include in the special issue. The workshop is designed to help those who want some guidance that might not be as readily available locally to have access to the expertise they need to develop their papers. For more information on submitting your work to the workshop, see LINK. Extended abstracts of up to 750 words are due 15 August 2017, and should be submitted to kalpana.shankar@ucd.iu and eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk with ‘SIG-SI Workshop’ in the subject line.

 

Submission Deadlines

Paper submission due: January 15, 2018
First round review notification: April 2, 2018
Revision due: June 1, 2018
Final notification: August 15, 2018

 

Guest Editors

Eric T. Meyer, University of Oxford, UK (eric.meyer@oii.ox.ac.uk) (ASIS&T SIG-SI Co-Chair)

Kalpana Shankar, University College Dublin, Ireland (kalpana.shankar@ucd.ie) (ASIS&T SIG-SI Co-Chair)

Matthew Willis, University of Oxford, UK (matthew.willis@oii.ox.ac.uk)

Sarika Sharma, Syracuse University, USA (skshar01@syr.edu)

Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University, USA (ssawyer@syr.edu)

 

References cited

Ackerman, Mark S., Dachtera, Juri, Pipek, Volkmar, and Wulf, Volker. (2013). Sharing Knowledge and Expertise: The CSCW View of Knowledge Management. Computer Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW), 22(4), 531-573.

Auernhammer, Jan and Hall, Hazel. (2014). Organizational culture in knowledge creation, creativity and innovation: Towards the Freiraum model. Journal of Information Science, 40(2), 154-166.

Fichman, Pnina and Rosenbaum, Howard. (2014). Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future. Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Grant, Kenneth A. (2011). Knowledge Management: An Enduring but Confusing Fashion. Electronic Journal of Knowledge Management, 9(2), 117-131.

Hara, Noriko and Fichman, Pnina. (2014). Frameworks for Understanding Knowledge Sharing in Online Communities: Boundaries and Boundary Crossing. In Pnina Fichman and Howard Rosenbaum (Eds.), Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future (pp. 89-100). Newcastle upon Tyne, UK: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.

Hislop, Donald. (2013). Knowledge management in organizations: A critical introduction. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kling, Rob. (2000). Learning About Information Technologies and Social Change: The Contribution of Social Informatics. The Information Society, 16(3), 217-232.

Kling, Rob. (2007). What Is Social Informatics and Why Does It Matter? The Information Society, 23(4), 205 – 220.

Meyer, Eric T. (2014). Examining the Hyphen: The Value of Social Informatics for Research and Teaching. In Pnina Fichman and Howard Rosenbaum (Eds.), Social Informatics: Past, Present and Future (pp. 57-74). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge Scholarly Publishers.

 

Call for SIG SI Chair/Co-Chair Nominations and Interest

Hi SIG SI members, I’m writing with some news about ASIS&T SIG SI, as determined during the ASIS&T 2016 Annual Meeting in Copenhagen. Howard Rosenbaum and Pnina Fichman, our co-chairs for many years now, have decided to step down from their current roles. They intend to remain involved in the SIG and its activities, including at Annual Meetings; not that we could hardly let them disappear completely on us, of course!

This does mean, however, that we are seeking new chairs or co-chairs for the SIG. Kristin Eschenfelder and myself have been given the task of administering this process. We are thus issuing the following call for nominations and interest for those potentially interested and willing to serve as a chair or co-chair of ASIS&T SIG SI for 2016-17. The responsibilities of the SIG’s chair or co-chair include the following:

  • Organize and run SIG SI’s annual symposium / workshop, with assistance from invited symposium committee members (if desired)

  • Coordinate panel proposals that SIG SI may sponsor for the ASIS&T Annual Meeting (the main conference)

  • Support the process of determining the winners of SIG SI’s awards, alongside SIG SI’s Awards Coordinator (Kristin Eschenfelder, as of our business meeting at ASIS&T 2016)

  • Attend the SIG Cabinet Meeting at the ASIS&T Annual Meeting (or determine a suitable substitute delegate from among the SIG officers)

  • Other leadership activities for the SIG, if desired and as determined along with SIG SI’s other officers

The chair or co-chairs would serve alongside SIG SI’s officers, including Communications officer Hillary Stark (North Texas), Social Chair Adam Worrall (Alberta), Awards Coordinator Kristin Eschenfelder (Wisconsin – Madison), and Treasurer Noriko Hara (Indiana).

If you or someone you know is potentially interested in stepping up and serving as SIG SI’s chair or co-chair, please submit a nomination to myself (worrall@ualberta.ca) and Kristin Eschenfelder (eschenfelder@wisc.edu) by Tuesday December 6th at 11:59pm US Eastern time. Please include SIG SI in the subject line. We are also more than happy to discuss the chair / co-chair role further with those who might be interested in serving. We thank you for your consideration of this crucial leadership role within the SIG!

Adam Worrall and Kristin Eschenfelder
ASIS&T SIG SI Elections Committee
worrall@ualberta.ca  eschenfelder@wisc.edu

The 12th Annual Social Informatics Research Symposium (SIG-SI): “The Social Informatics of Work and Play”

Please join us in Copenhagen and celebrate with us as we mark the 12th year of the SIG-SI Research Symposium!

Saturday, October 15, 2015, 8:30 AM – 12:30 PM
Crowne Plaza Copenhagen Towers
Copenhagen, Denmark

Organizers:
Pnina Fichman, Indiana University (fichman@indiana.edu)
Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University (hrosenba@indiana.edu)
Eric Meyer, Oxford Internet Institute, United Kingdom
Adam Worrall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada

Sponsored by SIG-SI and the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics

Note: Early registration deadline for the conference and the workshop is Friday, 9/25/2015

Schedule

8:30-8:40 Welcome

8:40-9:10 Opening Keynote

Kalpana Shankar
University of Dublin

9:10-10:10 Papers

9:10-9:30 An Analysis of Canadian Media Regarding The Potential Impact of Social Media and Cyberspaces on young bisexual and gay men

Blake Hawkins; Elizabeth Saewyc

9:30-9:50 Coping with Private and Academic Information Needs Abroad: An exploratory Study of International Students

Jette Hyldegård and Morten Hertzum, Royal School of Library and Information Science, University of Copenhagen

9:50-10:10 Impact of IT on Library Patrons: A Perspective from Pakistani Universities

Muhammad Sajid MirzaIslamic Research Institute, International Islamic University, Islamabad

10:10-10:30 Break

10:30-11:10 Papers

10:30-10:50 Rethinking STIN

Chase McCoy, Indiana University

10:50-11:10 Algorithms and the natural attitude

Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University

11:10-12:00 Awards

11:10-11:25 Best Student paper

Tweet to learn: Expertise and centrality in conference Twitter networks

11:25-11:40 Best Social Informatics Paper Runner up

Online Favela: The Use of Social Media by the Marginalized in Brazil

David Nemer, University of Kentucky

11:40-11:55 Best Social Informatics Paper

Social Networks and the Success of Market Intermediaries: Evidence From the U.S. Residential Real Estate Industry

Kevin Crowston and Steve Sawyer, Syracuse University

12:00-12:30 Closing Keynote

Eric Meyer
Oxford Internet Institute

Registration Fees:

Early-bird: $90  Late:  $120

To register for the workshop (and the conference):

https://www.asist.org/events/annual-meeting/annual-meeting-2015/register/

For more about the workshop:

https://www.asist.org/events/annual-meeting/annual-meeting-2015/seminars-and-workshops/11th-annual-social-informatics-research-symposium-the-impacts-of-social-informatics-research-sigsi/

For more about Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics:

http://rkcsi.indiana.edu

________________________________________

ASIS&T 2016 Annual Meeting
Copenhagen, Denmark | Oct. 14-18, 2016

Creating Knowledge, Enhancing Lives through Information & Technology

CFP-A Combined SIG-SI and SIG-USE Full-Day Workshop – Enhancing Lives through Information and Technology

Call for Papers and Participation

Enhancing Lives through Information and Technology – A Combined SIG-SI and SIG-USE Full-Day Workshop

The Social Informatics of Work and Play (SIG-SI): Morning
Information Behavior in Workplaces (SIG-USE): Afternoon

ASIS&T Annual Meeting, Copenhagen, Denmark
October 15, 2016

Organizers
Katriina Byström, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Katriina.Bystrom@hioa.no<mailto:Katriina.Bystrom@hioa.no>
Pnina Fichman, Indiana University, Bloomington, fichman@indiana.edu<mailto:fichman@indiana.edu>
Luanne Freund, University of British Columbia, Luanne.Freund@ubc.ca<mailto:Luanne.Freund@ubc.ca>
Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University, Bloomington, hrosenba@indiana.edu<mailto:hrosenba@indiana.edu>

Join us at ASIS&T in Copenhagen for a full-day pre-conference workshop to explore the ways in which our uses of information and technologies improve our work and social lives. Two vital and dynamic SIGs are joining forces for a workshop that will provide two interesting and complementary perspectives in the conference theme.

In the morning session, SIG-SI will bring a perspective that focuses on the social aspects of information and communication technologies (ICT) in work and play across all areas of ASIS&T. In the afternoon session, SIG-USE will focus on information related activities from different research perspectives and explores the significance of information seeking and use on our lives.

Submissions may include empirical, critical, conceptual and theoretical papers and posters, as well as richly described practice cases and demonstrations. The combined workshop will allow networking between members of both SIGs during the day.

MORNING: THE SOCIAL INFORMATICS OF WORK AND PLAY (SIG SI)
Co-sponsored by the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics

This year’s conference theme is “creating knowledge, enhancing lives through information & technology.” This is a particularly apposite theme for SIG-SI, because the social impacts of ICT and the complex relations among people, technologies, and the contexts of ICT design, implementation, and use have long been core concerns of social informatics. The SIG-SI morning session, our 12th annual gathering at ASIS&T annual meetings, will bring a critical perspective that focuses on the social aspects of ICT that cuts across all areas of ASIS&T This year, we are particularly interested in papers that investigate the social informatics of work and play.

We define “social” broadly to include critical and historical approaches as well as contemporary social analysis. We also define “technology” broadly to include traditional technologies  (e.g., paper, books, etc.), state-of-the-art computer systems, and mobile and pervasive devices. Submissions may include papers and posters that explore the ways in which people’s uses of ICT affect their practices and behaviors while at work, play, and engaged in their social lives.

We are particularly interested in work that assumes a critical stance towards the Symposium’s theme, but are also soliciting research on other related social informatics topics. We encourage all scholars interested in social aspects of ICT (broadly defined) to share their research and research in progress by submitting an extended abstract of their work and attending the symposium. Some of the questions we ask include:

• What are the impacts of ICT on people’s practices and behaviors while at work, play, and engaged in their social lives?
• What are some of the ways our work and play practices shape the design and development of ICT?
• What are the ways ICT positively and negatively impact organizations, work, play, and social life?
• What kinds of theoretical and methodological frameworks are best suited for studying the mutual shaping of ICT and practices and behaviors while at work and play?

The schedule for the morning session of the symposium will involve the presentations of papers, a panel of distinguished scholars, and the best social informatics paper awards for 2015. We expect an engaging discussion with lively interactions with the audience.

SIG-SI symposium chairs

Pnina Fichman, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
Howard Rosenbaum, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, USA
Eric Meyer, Oxford Internet Institute, Oxford, UK
Adam Worrall, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

AFTERNOON: INFORMATION BEHAVIOUR IN WORKPLACES (SIG-USE)

This year’s SIG USE symposium focuses on information issues at work. It acknowledges social, individual and technological perspectives on the roles and flows that information takes as part of physical and digital work. The broad approach relates to the conference theme with a focus on information behavior (IB) or on information practices (IP) in connection to workplaces.

Earlier generations were accustomed to stable and localized work; now work activities and contexts have and are radically changing. During their work life, people may experience several career changes, are expected to learn new skills and adapt to new ideas as well as manage the increasingly fluid boundaries between work and leisure. Moreover, much of information and data are internetworked and accessible simultaneously by multiple mobile devices supporting networked communities anyplace, anywhere, anytime. This challenges both the creation and consumption of information used for work – or at work; it also affects how, when and where people work, as well as their productivity, collegiality and innovativeness.

Despite, or perhaps due to, the advances in technology, today’s workplaces remain challenged by how to create, discover, share, value and enhance information and knowledge at and for work; and, how to design and manage the systems that support these functions, which are so critical to organizationally effective and individually rewarding work. The issues are many, from the consequences of new devices that are stretching the ways that an organization works, to the efficacy dynamics (stress, motivation, collaboration, productivity, age, etc.) and to the new skills and expertise required to work in such changing and changeable environments. Information is indispensable in many, if not all, workplace activities; as a resource for getting work done as well as for learning, managing change, developing and maintaining processes and creating professional networks.

Specific issues to be addressed depend on the interest of the participants and the issues they bring into the workshop. Welcome topics include:

• Critical cultural information behavior – how do we infuse our workplaces and practices with diversity and social justice sensibilities?
• Collaborative IB; virtual team
• Digital workplaces, peopleless offices & officeless people – what happens when the physical workplace dissolves?
• Everyday Life Information (in the workplace)
• Frameworks for understanding IB/IP in work settings
• IB/IP and  workplace or information systems design
• Organizational behaviour research – what can we learn from this field of research that is relevant to IB/IP?
• Organizational information genres
• Personal Information Management (in the workplace)
• The blurring of lines between personal and professional in digital information use in the workplace
• The impact of mobile devices on IB/IP in the workplace
• Workplace culture, diversity and inclusion – how these shape and are shaped by information behaviour (IB)/information practices (IP)?
• and any other work-related informational topics

We aim to an interactive workshop to enable the fullest exchange of ideas amongst attendees. For this reason, we encourage participants to submit; even if participation without a paper/poster is an eligible option. The workshop features a keynote by Professor Hazel Hall (preliminarily confirmed), presentation of selected papers, a joint poster session between the SIGs, and roundtable discussions based on short papers and posters by participants.

Documentation: short papers and posters are shared digitally among the participants. Roundtable discussions are documented by a designated person in each group and collated by symposium chairs to a short summary that is made available for the participants afterwards.

SIG-USE symposium chairs

David Allen, Leeds University, UK
Katriina Byström, Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway
Nicole A. Cooke, The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA
Luanne Freund, University of British Columbia, Canada

TENTATIVE SCHEDULE

SI – opening keynote: 8.30-9.00
Paper presentations: 9.00-10.30
Break 10.30-10.45
Panel: 10.45-11.45
SIG SI paper awards: 11.45-12.15
SI- closing discussion and remarks: 12.15-12.45

USE- opening and opening keynote: 13.45-14.45
Short Paper Session: 14.45-15.45
Break 15.45-16.00
Roundtable discussion based on papers & posters: 16.00-17.30
SIG USE Awards 17.30-17.45
USE – closing remarks: 17.45-18.00

CALL FOR PAPERS AND POSTERS FOR BOTH SIGS

Submit a short paper (2000 words) or poster (500 words) by August 19, 2016.

SIG-SI: Please send your submission as a PDF file to: hrosenba@indiana.edu<mailto:hrosenba@indiana.edu>

SIG-USE: Please, send your submission as a PDF-file to: katriina.bystrom@hioa.no<mailto:katriina.bystrom@hioa.no>

Acceptance announcements made by August 31, 2016 in time for conference early registration (ends Sept 2, 2016).

FEES

Members – SIG-SI session: $100 – $120 after Sept. 2, 2016
Members – SIG-USE session: $100 – $120 after September September 2, 2016
Members – attending both SIG-SI and SIG-USE sessions: $180 – $200 after Sept. 2, 2016

Non-members  – SIG-SI Session: $120 – $140, after September 2, 2016
Non-members  – SIG-USE Session: $120 – $140, after September 2, 2016
Non-members – attending both SIG-SI and SIG-USE sessions: $230 – $250 after Sept. 2, 2016

________________________________________

ASIS&T 2016 Annual Meeting
Copenhagen, Denmark | Oct. 14-18, 2016

Creating Knowledge, Enhancing Lives through Information & Technology

The 2016 Social Informatics Best Paper Award

Call for nominations for the 2016 Social Informatics Best Paper Award

The Special Interest Group for Social Informatics (SIG-SI) and the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics are seeking nominations for an award for the best paper published in a peer reviewed journal on a topic informed by social informatics during the 2015 calendar year. The author or authors will present their paper at the 12th Annual SIG-SI Symposium on Saturday, October 15, 2016 and receive a $1,000 cash award at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) in Copenhagen, Denmark in October, 2016.

Nomination letters should be sent to Howard Rosenbaum (hrosenba@indiana.edu<mailto:hrosenba@indiana.edu>) or Pnina Fichman (fichman@indiana.edu<mailto:fichman@indiana.edu>) by August 19, 2016 and must include a full citation, a brief explanation for the nomination, and a copy of the article. Self nominations are acceptable.

Winners will be notified by September 9, 2016.

For more information about the Special Interest Group for Social Informatics

(SIG-SI): [https://asistsigsi.wordpress.com<https://asistsigsi.wordpress.com/%5Dhttps://asistsigsi.wordpress.com<https://asistsigsi.wordpress.com/&gt;

For more information about the Rob Kling Center for Social Informatics:

[http://rkcsi.indiana.edu<http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/%5Dhttp://rkcsi.indiana.edu<http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/&gt;

Pnina Fichman and Howard Rosenbaum
Department of Information and Library Science
School of Informatics and Computing, Indiana University
________________________________________

CFP HICSS ’50 Minitrack on Collective Intelligence and Crowds

CFP HICSS ’50 Minitrack on Collective Intelligence and Crowds
Track: Digital and Social Media
Hawaii International Conference on Systems Science (HICSS)
January 4-7, 2017, Big Island, Hawaii, USA
Papers Due: June 15, 2016
This minitrack is open to analysis of collective intelligence, new sociotechnical configuration of knowledge creation, and crowdsourcing. Included also is the analysis of social interaction as a way of describing underlying social structure, and in particular the social construction of identity and roles. Thus the minitrack invites a range of content areas that lend themselves to the analysis of relations between people, collectives, and machines, as well as the products produced as a result of these sociotechnical relations.
We live surrounded by socially constructed identities – organizations, nations, websites – all of which are constituted through a complex interplay of interactions, a kind of distributed cognition. To allow for these collectives to evolve, it is necessary to have not only a representation in an individual’s mind but also the knowledge that similar representations exist in the minds of others. The way we can create shared representations have changed with the proliferation of a wide range of Internet platforms. These Internet platforms allow people to aggregate knowledge from socially distant areas. They also allow diverse groups of people – and maybe machines in the form of artificial intelligences  – to negotiate identities. With these socio-technical configurations we can build collective intelligences that themselves will steer the quest for knowledge. These collectives can be self-catalyzing, deciding individually or collaboratively what to do next, out of which novel and practical ideas emerge.
While these open design collectives rely on organic growth and slow embedding of members in the network, alternative structures based on crowds can be assembled more rapidly. Between the two extremes are a host of different organizational and social structures, in which committed members of a community create, improve, and share ideas. The output of these socio-technical systems often takes the form of digital media, and their traces are varied, ranging from ephemeral short messages to curated collaborative knowledge repositories.
We are interested in 1) papers that observe, analyze, or visualize these socio-technical structures and their outputs; 2) papers that analyze the phenomena of crowdsourcing, collective intelligence and collaborative mass knowledge production; 3) design research that creates and evaluates new tools and processes; and 4) papers that simulate the production processes and outcomes through software.
We are looking for papers about the mechanisms that explain the emergence of collective identity. Particularly we are open to papers that explore unusual ways of modeling emergent organizations: models that demonstrate or reflect the influence of social systems on user behaviors, models that consider the multiple connections between people, technology, and institutions, models of technological and social affordances, models that break personal identity into sub-relations, models that examine the emergence of roles, identity, and institutions, as well as socio-technical models of deviance and disruption. We are interested in applying the ideas of James March, Mark Granovetter, Harrison White, Charles Tilly and related scholars to information systems.
In sum, the content of the minitrack is open to analysis of collective intelligence, new sociotechnical configuration of knowledge creation, and crowdsourcing. Included also is the analysis of social interaction as a way of describing underlying social structure, and in particular the social construction of identity and roles. Thus the track is open to a wide range of content areas that lend themselves to the analysis of relations between people, collectives, and machines, as well as the products produced as a result of these sociotechnical relations.
Important deadlines for authors:
June 15: Submit full manuscripts for review. Review is double-blind.
Aug 16: Review System emails Acceptance Notices to authors.
September 15: Submission final papers.
Oct 1: Early Registration fee deadline.
Oct 15: Papers without at least one registered author will 
be removed from the Proceedings.
Organizers:
Pnina Fichman, Associate Professor in the School of Informatics and Computing and the Director of the Rob Kling Center of Social Informatics at Indiana University, Bloomington.
Jeffrey V. Nickerson, Professor and Director of the Center for Decision Technologies in the Wesley J. Howe School of Technology Management at Stevens Institute of Technology.
Donald Steiny, President and Founder of the Institute for Social Network Analysis of the Economy, a member of the Silicon Valley Network Analysis Project, and an instructor at the University of California Santa Cruz.
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